Tractatus duo, alter De Ventis, alter perbrevis De Terraemotu. Adiecto indice copiosissimo…

Bologna, Giovanni Battista Bellagamba, 1601 Folio (312x217 mm). [8], 163 [i.e. 165], [13] pp. Woodcut printer’s device on title; head- and tailpieces, decorative initials. Illustrated with 39 engravings, 3 of which are full-page. A perfect full-margin copy in original boards. A most handsomely illustrated book, with fine engraved maps and plates of wind roses, compasses, and other technologies by the physician from Forlì. “This rare tract, of which only one edition was published, discusses the effects of winds on both land and sea. There are several schematic circular world maps in elegant wind cards and one larger Carta Marina outlining the continents in the style of Gastaldi” (R.W. Shirley, Mapping of the World, no. 232). “Similarly to Agricola Padovani saw volcanoes as geographical and historical toponyms. ‘This mountain snatched Pliny,’ he wrote of Vesuvius. Using the examples of the Campi Flegrei, Vesuvius, Etna and the Aeolian Islands, Padovani argued that there were places where the hot press of subterranean winds and ‘matter’ within the crust ignited fierce fires, to the point that ‘so much smoke and fire pours out that it combusts and destroys nearly everything around.’ Padovani had an entire vocabulary for the features of such places: speluncis, antris, cloacis, et scrobibus (caves, caverns, sewers, and trenches). There were no observations to speak, however” (S. Cocco, Watching Vesuvius, p. 31). The last part of the work is devoted to earthquakes, and Padovani “envisioned an early warning system for earthquakes, and, also, categorized phenomena that were either concurrent with or subsequent to an earthquake, similarly to the typology of things seen before, during, and after an eruption that Vesuvius writers described three decades later. Earthquakes were more frequent than eruptions, and in this respect he was no lacking in a language of observation” (ibid.). Bruni-Evans, 3833; Riccardi, i (ii), pp. 230-231 (“Bella edizione”); Honeyman Coll., vi, 2387; R.W. Shirley, Mapping of the World, no. 232; S. Cocco, Watching Vesuvius. A History of Science and Culture in Early Modern Italy, Chicago 2013, pp. 29-32.
€ 16.000